Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Show Notes 09/14/2014

Sunday Show 9/14/14

The untold story of The Star Spangled Banner
This weekend marks the 200th anniversary of the writing of “The Star-Spangled Banner.” Not only our national anthem, the Star-Spangled Banner was the flag that flew during the War of 1812 during the Battle of Baltimore at Fort McHenry, inspiring Francis Scott Key to write the words that would become the famous song.
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Baseball movie brings Dads home
Little boys grow up with lots of heroes – caped crusaders in comic books, movie and music icons, teachers, uncles, grandfathers and sports stars, to name a few. But what about Dad? What would it take to make Dad a hero?
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Bundy says land is not owned by Feds
Controversial figure Cliven Bundy said Thursday a transfer of public land from federal to state control was unnecessary, on grounds that Nevada already has a right to most of the land. Many local officials advocate for such a transfer, but Bundy said you can’t ask for something you already own.
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Benghazi panel begins hearings with questions on US diplomats' safety
The select Benghazi Committee holds its first open hearing Wednesday, employing broad congressional powers to try to answer lingering questions ranging from what led to the fatal 2012 terror strikes on a U.S. outpost in Libya to what is being done to better protect U.S. diplomats worldwide.
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‘It doesn’t make sense’: Concerns over enlisting DoD in Ebola response
The Obama administration’s decision to enlist the Defense Department in responding to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa is raising concerns that the task is pulling the already-stretched military away from other missions, including vital counter terrorism operations.
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Heroic Marines hunted Taliban in the bloodiest battle
American military personnel are smarter and savvier than previous generations, but they share the same love for country and desire to take the fight to the enemy, according to Bing West, the tireless embed reporter who has chronicled the work of men and women in uniform throughout the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
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American shakedown: Police won't charge you but they'll grab your money
On its official website, the Canadian government informs its citizens that “there is no limit to the amount of money that you may legally take into or out of the United States.” Nonetheless, it adds, banking in the U.S. can be difficult for non-residents, so Canadians shouldn’t carry large amounts of cash.
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Public school receive mine resistant ambus protected vehicle
The police department for San Diego’s public schools recently revealed that they have acquired a large armored combat vehicle from the U.S. military. The $700,000 mine-resistant ambush protected vehicle (MRAP), which is designed to withstand blasts from improvised explosive devices and mines, was given to law enforcement for the Unified School District in April.
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Militia threatens to block traffic at international bridges
Law enforcement officials and city leaders from across the Rio Grande Valley are preparing for what they say could result in tense moments or violence. Officials say they received word that members of a militia are threatening to block ports of entry.
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I Pencil
I am a lead pencil—the ordinary wooden pencil familiar to all boys and girls and adults who can read and write. Writing is both my vocation and my avocation; that's all I do.
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Wasted! Feds spend millions of tax dollars getting monkeys drunk
There’s a whole lot of drinking going on in the name of government science, and some watchdogs think it’s the American taxpayer who is getting hammered. Right now the National Institutes of Health is spending $3.2 million to get monkeys to drink alcohol excessively to determine what effect it has long term on their body tissue.
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