Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Show Notes 09/14/2014

Sunday Show 9/14/14

The untold story of The Star Spangled Banner
This weekend marks the 200th anniversary of the writing of “The Star-Spangled Banner.” Not only our national anthem, the Star-Spangled Banner was the flag that flew during the War of 1812 during the Battle of Baltimore at Fort McHenry, inspiring Francis Scott Key to write the words that would become the famous song.
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Baseball movie brings Dads home
Little boys grow up with lots of heroes – caped crusaders in comic books, movie and music icons, teachers, uncles, grandfathers and sports stars, to name a few. But what about Dad? What would it take to make Dad a hero?
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Bundy says land is not owned by Feds
Controversial figure Cliven Bundy said Thursday a transfer of public land from federal to state control was unnecessary, on grounds that Nevada already has a right to most of the land. Many local officials advocate for such a transfer, but Bundy said you can’t ask for something you already own.
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Benghazi panel begins hearings with questions on US diplomats' safety
The select Benghazi Committee holds its first open hearing Wednesday, employing broad congressional powers to try to answer lingering questions ranging from what led to the fatal 2012 terror strikes on a U.S. outpost in Libya to what is being done to better protect U.S. diplomats worldwide.
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‘It doesn’t make sense’: Concerns over enlisting DoD in Ebola response
The Obama administration’s decision to enlist the Defense Department in responding to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa is raising concerns that the task is pulling the already-stretched military away from other missions, including vital counter terrorism operations.
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Heroic Marines hunted Taliban in the bloodiest battle
American military personnel are smarter and savvier than previous generations, but they share the same love for country and desire to take the fight to the enemy, according to Bing West, the tireless embed reporter who has chronicled the work of men and women in uniform throughout the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
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American shakedown: Police won't charge you but they'll grab your money
On its official website, the Canadian government informs its citizens that “there is no limit to the amount of money that you may legally take into or out of the United States.” Nonetheless, it adds, banking in the U.S. can be difficult for non-residents, so Canadians shouldn’t carry large amounts of cash.
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Public school receive mine resistant ambus protected vehicle
The police department for San Diego’s public schools recently revealed that they have acquired a large armored combat vehicle from the U.S. military. The $700,000 mine-resistant ambush protected vehicle (MRAP), which is designed to withstand blasts from improvised explosive devices and mines, was given to law enforcement for the Unified School District in April.
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Militia threatens to block traffic at international bridges
Law enforcement officials and city leaders from across the Rio Grande Valley are preparing for what they say could result in tense moments or violence. Officials say they received word that members of a militia are threatening to block ports of entry.
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I Pencil
I am a lead pencil—the ordinary wooden pencil familiar to all boys and girls and adults who can read and write. Writing is both my vocation and my avocation; that's all I do.
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Wasted! Feds spend millions of tax dollars getting monkeys drunk
There’s a whole lot of drinking going on in the name of government science, and some watchdogs think it’s the American taxpayer who is getting hammered. Right now the National Institutes of Health is spending $3.2 million to get monkeys to drink alcohol excessively to determine what effect it has long term on their body tissue.
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Saturday, September 13, 2014

Show Notes 09/11/2014

Thursday Show 9/11/14

Democrat Senate candidate doges questions about ties to communist group
The Democratic nominee for U.S. Senate in Montana last month dodged questions about her ties to a group that explicitly advocates the abolition of capitalism in the United States. “That sounds like contemporary communism,” said Montana Public Radio reporter Edward O’Brien of the Industrial Workers of the World, a labor group for which Montana legislator Amanda Curtis’ husband is a representative.
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How the world responded to Obama's Islamic State speech
From Tehran to Berlin, commentators are chewing over President Barack Obama’s speech last night on fighting the self-named Islamic State (IS). And while the prospect of expanded US intervention in the Middle East alarms some, he gets plaudits from others for his combative message.
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James Madison: “President can use force without authorization only to repel sudden attacks”
Editor's note: Can the president unilaterally initiate the use of military force without a prior authorization from Congress? In his notes from the Constitutional Convention, James Madison stated that the Executive could only do so when it was necessary "to repel sudden attacks."
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Utah teacher accidently shoots self in leg at school
Officials say a Utah elementary school teacher has been rushed to the hospital after a concealed firearm she was carrying accidently discharged in a school bathroom and shot her in the leg.
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Announcing He’s Leaving CNN, Piers Morgan Has This Warning for the NRA
Piers Morgan, in a series of tweets Tuesday, announced he is officially leaving CNN to seek “pastures new.” In his typical bombastic fashion, however, the former television host did not go quietly, hinting he planned to continue his controversial campaign against guns in America and the NRA. Morgan went on to say CNN President Jeff Zucker had offered him a chance to work for two years on an interview show, but that declined.
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Jurassic squirrels push back clock on emergence of mammals
The fossil remains of squirrel-like mammals with a hefty dose of cute are helping reset the clock for mammalian evolution, according to a new study. Over the past three years, a team of researchers has uncovered six 160-million-year-old fossils that represent three new species who were living in trees at the time of the dinosaurs.
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US Military's New Laser Gun Zaps Drones
Boeing recently announced that its mobile laser weapon, dubbed the High Energy Laser Mobile Demonstrator (HEL MD), successfully shot down more than 150 drones, rockets and other mock enemy targets in a third round of tests. The trials prove that the laser weapon is reliable and capable of consistently "acquiring, tracking and engaging a variety of targets in different environments," according to Boeing.
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Look Ma, No Hands! GM Announces 'Intelligent' Driving Tech
Forget what you learned in driver's ed. The newest must-have feature for cars lets drivers navigate without putting their hands on the steering wheel or even stepping on the gas pedal.
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Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Show Notes 09/07/2014

Sunday Show 9/7/14

Bill Cosby bashes thugs and welfare moms: “We can't blame white people
Bill Cosby’s rant against uneducated and apathetic Americans is forcing the country to reevaluate the lifestyles of lifetime welfare recipients.
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Top CIA officer in Benghazi delayed response to terrorist attack, US security team members claim
A U.S. security team in Benghazi was held back from immediately responding to the attack on the American diplomatic mission on orders of the top CIA officer there, three of those involved told Fox News’ Bret Baier.
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In Jesus name, Navy Chaplain running for public office
The chaplain who fought the Navy for the right to pray “in Jesus name” and lost his job while winning the war is running for state representative in Colorado, and he’s still vowing to defend Christians targeted by secular agendas. It was in 2006 when WND reported Chaplain Gordon Klingenschmitt was dismissed from the Navy when he insisted his religious-freedom rights allowed him to pray “in Jesus name,” which conflicted with Navy policy.
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Respiratory illness believed to have hospitalized hundreds of children
Health officials suspect that a rare respiratory virus is the reason that hundreds of children across America have been sickened in recent weeks, according to a published report.
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New York schools drop Michelle O’s lunch program
Central New York’s Fayetteville-Manlius and Baldwinsville school districts are the latest to ditch the National School Lunch Program, which was revamped in 2010 under the guidance of First Lady Michelle Obama in an effort to fight childhood obesity.
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Is nothing sacred? Forest Service says drop chocolate and add fruit to your smores
One of the great moments in history came when an unsuspecting camper sandwiched a marshmallow and a piece of chocolate between two graham crackers -- creating an American masterpiece -- the s’more.
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USDA seizes more illegal giant snails
The giant African snail damages buildings, destroys crops and can cause meningitis in humans. But some people still want to collect, and even eat, the slimy invaders.
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Detroit Satanists say they won't sacrifice animals, people
A new religious group aims to bring the devil to Detroit. The Satanic Temple today marks the launch of its first chapter outside New York. But leaders say they don’t worship Satan. They don’t practice cannibalism, or sacrifice people or animals.
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Wealthy French Jews Are Fleeing Anti-Semitism and Bringing Their Money
For this Jewish population, there are two main options when it comes to moving: the United States or Israel. While Israel feels more familiar to many of those seeking to migrate – it’s nearby and many already have Israeli passports — Mr. Kruzhkov notes that their businesses are often the key to determining a location.
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Dutch Politician: ‘If You Are Waving an ISIS flag You Are Waving an Exit Ticket. Leave!’
A Dutch lawmaker once put on trial for his views on Islam called Thursday for Dutch Muslims supportive of groups like the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIS/ISIL) to leave the country and never be allowed to return.
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Sunday, September 07, 2014

Show Notes 09/04/2014

Thursday Show 9/4/14

Victory over Japan Day
Japan’s devastating surprise aerial attack on the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor on Oahu, Hawaii, on December 7, 1941, capped a decade of deteriorating relations between Japan and the United States and led to an immediate U.S. declaration of war the following day.
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UN Climate Chief: 'Not Very Far' from Considering 'Climate Change as a Public Health Emergency'
Secretary of State John Kerry has called climate change “the biggest challenge of all that we face right now,” and his French counterpart has warned of climate “chaos” in 500 days.
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New data backs ice age prediction
As the United Nations prepares for its 2014 Climate Summit in New York this month with an agenda to advance a new carbon-emissions regulatory agreement to supersede the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, the Russian scientist who correctly predicted the lack of global warming over the past 19 years has gained new scientific support for his belief that Earth is in the beginning of a prolonged ice age.
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ABC, CBS, NBC schooled on covering IRS scandal
The bombshell revelation about the surging IRS scandal last week was that Lois Lerner’s emails – those described as lost forever by the federal agency – were in fact backed up.
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Mystery fake cell phone towers intercepting calls
Seventeen fake cellphone towers were discovered across the U.S. last week, according to a report in Popular Science. Rather than offering you cellphone service, the towers appear to be connecting to nearby phones, bypassing their encryption, and either tapping calls or reading texts.
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CVS stores stop selling all tobacco products
At a CVS store near Times Square, the shelves are notable for what they no longer display: cigarettes. Now the only smoking products to be found are those that could help customers quit.
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Coburn: Let’s change Constitution
Sen. Tom Coburn is pushing for a national convention to amend the Constitution. The Oklahoma Republican, who has grown disenchanted with gridlock in Washington, will officially launch his effort after he retires from the Senate in a few months.
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Friday, September 05, 2014

Show Notes 08/31/2014

Sunday Show 8/31/14

Gun tourism grows in popularity in recent years
The death of an Arizona firearms instructor by a 9-year-old girl who was firing a fully automatic Uzi displayed a tragic side of what has become a hot industry in the U.S.: gun tourism.
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Christianity's central doctrine is being twisted
At a time when the American church is undergoing seismic changes, one threat is particularly insidious, argues renowned scholar, professor and radio host Michael Brown.
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San Jose police to return military grade armored vehicle
Fearing backlash from the public, San Jose police have opted to get rid of a heavily armored 15-ton truck, a military hand-me-down the city received from the Pentagon earlier this year.
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Hawaii gov. blames political loss on gay marriage
Hawaii Gov. Neil Abercrombie said he lost his bid for re-election in a Democratic primary because of his decision to call a special session to legalize gay marriage.
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In states, a legislative rush to nullify federal gun laws
Across the country, a thriving dissatisfaction with the U.S. government is prompting a growing spate of bills in state legislatures aimed at defying federal control over firearms – more than 200 during the last decade, a News21 investigation found.
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Wednesday, September 03, 2014

Show Notes 08/28/2014

Thursday Show 8/28/14

Feds sue St. Anthony over rejection of Islamic Center
The federal government announced its plans to sue the city of St. Anthony for rejecting a proposed Islamic center a couple of years ago. U.S. Attorney Andrew Luger formally announced the civil rights lawsuit at a news conference Wednesday afternoon.
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'You're Next,' Israeli PR Campaign Warns West
A leading private Israeli marketing firm believes the Jewish state can do a whole lot better when it comes to public relations during war time, and provided an object lesson to that effect in the form of a graphical banner campaign that quickly went viral on Facebook.
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U.S. to allow some immigrant deportees to return under settlement
Homeland security officials will not use threats and intimidation against immigrants facing possible deportation, and will allow some — perhaps thousands — with ties to Southern California to return under an agreement announced Wednesday.
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Illegal Aliens storm San Diego; second attempt thwarted
Illegal aliens successfully landed on a San Diego beach in a panga boat on Monday and ran to shore - but, when another group tried the same thing on Tuesday, U.S. Customs and Border (CBP) agents were waiting for them.
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NASA: dangerous sunspot aligning with Earth
A direct hit on Earth from an X-class flare could cause major disruptions, or even destruction, to the U.S. electrical grid, which already is very vulnerable, as well as to life-sustaining critical infrastructures dependent on the grid to function.
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California law calls for schools to teach about the significance of Obama's election
The measure, AB 1912, requires the California Instructional Quality Commission to consider including instruction on Obama’s election during its next revision of history-social science curriculum. This curriculum hasn’t been updated in nine years, the bill’s sponsor, Assemblyman Chris Holden (D), said in a statement, and will not be updated until the 2015-2016 school year.
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Here's your ticket out of Common Core
The Common Core school standards imposed on teachers by Washington bureaucrats have been rejected by multiple states, targeted by lawsuits and criticized as more indoctrination than education.
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Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Show Notes 08/24/2014



Sunday Show 8/24/14

New go-to career for New England's young: Farming
Farming is hip in New England. Across the region, young people are choosing crops over cubicles, new farms are popping up and the local food movement is spreading.
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Invasive insect threatens iconic Florida citrus
Citrus has always been synonymous with Florida. The orange adorns the state license plate. The University of Florida's famed football stadium was named after an orange magnate. There is even a county called Citrus.
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Conservatives praise “Giver” as a cautionary tale about failed utopia
Conservatives are praising “The Giver,” a film depicting a futuristic society that has eliminated both personal freedom and human emotion, as a warning against the temptations of utopianism.
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Atheist group attacks Arkansas pizza parlor over church bulletin discount
Wisconsin-based Freedom from Religion Foundation sent a letter to Steven Rose, the owner of Bailey's Pizza in Searcy, Ark., warning him that his pizza parlor's offer to knock 10% off churchgoers' tabs amounted to discrimination, local KTHV-TV reported.
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How grandparents can pass down good financial wisdom
It can be tempting for grandparents to spoil their grandchildren; after all, isn’t that part of the job description? But experts warn the money and financial habits passed down from generation to generation are long lasting.
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Birth control mandate: HHS offers new way for religious employers
The Obama administration took steps Friday it said would ensure that women who work for religious employers will have continued access to cost-free birth control coverage, while respecting the views of their employers.
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Homeschool family sues VA social services for removing children claiming parent imagined kids illnessess
A homeschooling advocacy group announced that it is suing social services caseworkers in Shenandoah County Virginia's Department of Social Services on behalf of homeschool parents that it says are falsely accused of child abuse and had their two children removed from parental custody and placed into foster care for over a month.
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Group think school program turns kids in to sheep
An Oprah-inspired program in public schools described by critics as an intrusive, emotionally manipulative effort with the laudable goal of ending bullying, cliques, gossip and other such behaviors, has been presented to a million students in 400 cities in 47 states.
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China dismisses US complaints about jet fighter intercept
Washington’s protest over a Chinese fighter jet that confronted a US jet by making three close passes was dismissed flatly this weekend by a Chinese defense official who said the fighter pilot acted “professionally” and kept a safe distance in what was a “routine” flight.
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